Abraham Wuchters
Abraham Wuchters (1608 - 23 May 1682) was a Dutch-Danish painter and engraver. He was born in Antwerp but had most of his career in Denmark where he, along with Karel van Mander III, was the preferred painter of the Danish King, nobility and Bourgeoisie during his day, together they represent the main influence from the Dutch Golden Age on Danish Baroque art. Wuchters was born in Antwerp in 1608. He arrived in Denmark in 1638 and was, the following year, employed as sketching master at Sorø Academy. Around the same time, he was summoned to Copenhagen where he painted several portraits of King Christian IV. In 1645 he returned to Copenhagen Castle to portray the King's children, including lrik Christian Gyldenløve (c. 1645, Danish National Gallery) and Duke Frederik (III) (c. 1645, Amalienborg Palace). In two periods, between 1658 and 1662, he worked at the Royal Swedish Court in Stockholm where he portrayed Queen Consort Christina (1660, Uppsala University and 1661, Stockholm Castle), Charles X Gustav and Hedvig Eleonora. Back in Denmark, Wuchters was engaged by Frederick III, who had instituted Denmark as an absolute monarchy in 1660, with responsibility for the maintenance of his paintings. n 1671 the new king, Christian V, appointed him as official Painter to the Danish Coirt and in 1873 he was also made official Engraver to the Danish Court. It was, therefore, he alone who decided how the face of the absolutist King was to be represented.

 

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Abraham Wuchters Queen Sophie Amalie painted in oil painting   

Painting ID::  83011
Abraham Wuchters
Queen Sophie Amalie painted in
oil on copper by Abraham Wuchters circa 1680 Date c 1680 cyf

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Queen Sophie Amalie oil painting   

Painting ID::  83208
Abraham Wuchters
Queen Sophie Amalie
c 1680 cyf

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Vitus Bering oil painting   

Painting ID::  85422
Abraham Wuchters
Vitus Bering
Date 1600s Medium Oil cjr

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Mogens Frijs, greve og rentemester oil painting   

Painting ID::  85424
Abraham Wuchters
Mogens Frijs, greve og rentemester
Date 1600s Medium Oil cjr

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Vitus Bering oil painting   

Painting ID::  89566
Abraham Wuchters
Vitus Bering
1600s Medium Oil cyf

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Mogens Frijs oil painting   

Painting ID::  89567
Abraham Wuchters
Mogens Frijs
1600s Medium Oil cyf

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Erik Pontoppidan den oil painting   

Painting ID::  91588
Abraham Wuchters
Erik Pontoppidan den
1600s Medium Oil cyf

   
   
     

 

 

Abraham Wuchters Erik Pontoppidan den Aldre oil painting   

Painting ID::  93684
Abraham Wuchters
Erik Pontoppidan den Aldre
1600s Medium oil cjr

   
   
     

 

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Abraham Wuchters
Abraham Wuchters (1608 - 23 May 1682) was a Dutch-Danish painter and engraver. He was born in Antwerp but had most of his career in Denmark where he, along with Karel van Mander III, was the preferred painter of the Danish King, nobility and Bourgeoisie during his day, together they represent the main influence from the Dutch Golden Age on Danish Baroque art. Wuchters was born in Antwerp in 1608. He arrived in Denmark in 1638 and was, the following year, employed as sketching master at Sorø Academy. Around the same time, he was summoned to Copenhagen where he painted several portraits of King Christian IV. In 1645 he returned to Copenhagen Castle to portray the King's children, including lrik Christian Gyldenløve (c. 1645, Danish National Gallery) and Duke Frederik (III) (c. 1645, Amalienborg Palace). In two periods, between 1658 and 1662, he worked at the Royal Swedish Court in Stockholm where he portrayed Queen Consort Christina (1660, Uppsala University and 1661, Stockholm Castle), Charles X Gustav and Hedvig Eleonora. Back in Denmark, Wuchters was engaged by Frederick III, who had instituted Denmark as an absolute monarchy in 1660, with responsibility for the maintenance of his paintings. n 1671 the new king, Christian V, appointed him as official Painter to the Danish Coirt and in 1873 he was also made official Engraver to the Danish Court. It was, therefore, he alone who decided how the face of the absolutist King was to be represented.