Adriaen Van Utrecht
Flemish Baroque Era Painter, 1599-1652 Flemish painter. He was apprenticed to Herman de Ryt in 1614 and later visited France, Italy and Germany before returning to Antwerp by 1625. He painted pantry scenes, farmyards with poultry, fish markets, game pieces, garlands and diverse still-lifes of fruit and vegetables. Game paintings are most frequent and reflect the influence of Frans Snyders. Adriaen adopted the same abundant displays of game, fruit and vegetables, usually set on a table parallel to the picture plane. Compositions typically fall in horizontal and vertical lines in contrast to the dynamic diagonals of Snyders. In large works, such as the Still-life with Game, Vegetables, Fruit and a Cockatoo (1650; Malibu, CA, Getty Mus.), Adriaen's accessories overflow the table on to the floor below. Baroque devices, such as a sweeping curtain and background window view, add movement and depth. Van Utrecht favoured warm earthen tones, especially grey-green, and a strong chiaroscuro light in his still-lifes; the latter may derive from his knowledge of Italian painting. The artist's style changed little during his career, save for the gradual elimination of figures in his paintings. The influence of Jan de Heem and Jan Fyt can also be seen in his later work.

 

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Adriaen Van Utrecht Still life of a basket of apples,grapes,plums,figs,gooseberries and redcurrants,together with a monkey,artichokes,celery,a melon,a pomegranate,a lemon oil painting   

Painting ID::  27334
Adriaen Van Utrecht
Still life of a basket of apples,grapes,plums,figs,gooseberries and redcurrants,together with a monkey,artichokes,celery,a melon,a pomegranate,a lemon
mk56 oil on canvas

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht A Pantry oil painting   

Painting ID::  28720
Adriaen Van Utrecht
A Pantry
mk61 1642 Oil on canvas 221x307cm

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht The old fish market in Antwerp oil painting   

Painting ID::  45452
Adriaen Van Utrecht
The old fish market in Antwerp
mk186 around 1630-40 Antwerp, Rubenshuis

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht Fishmonger's Stall oil painting   

Painting ID::  51084
Adriaen Van Utrecht
Fishmonger's Stall
Oil on canvas, 215 x298 cm

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht The Pantry oil painting   

Painting ID::  51292
Adriaen Van Utrecht
The Pantry
1642 Oil on canvas, 221 x 307

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht Still Life oil painting   

Painting ID::  80445
Adriaen Van Utrecht
Still Life
1644(1644) Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 185 x 242.5 cm (72.8 x 95.5 in) cyf

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht Vanitas - Still Life with Bouquet and Skull oil painting   

Painting ID::  81735
Adriaen Van Utrecht
Vanitas - Still Life with Bouquet and Skull
Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 67 x 86 cm (26.4 x 33.9 in) cjr

   
   
     

 

 

Adriaen Van Utrecht A Still Life with Games and Vegetables oil painting   

Painting ID::  90929
Adriaen Van Utrecht
A Still Life with Games and Vegetables
oil on canvas Dimensions 81.5 x 115.5 cm (32.1 x 45.5 in) cyf

   
   
     

 

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Adriaen Van Utrecht
Flemish Baroque Era Painter, 1599-1652 Flemish painter. He was apprenticed to Herman de Ryt in 1614 and later visited France, Italy and Germany before returning to Antwerp by 1625. He painted pantry scenes, farmyards with poultry, fish markets, game pieces, garlands and diverse still-lifes of fruit and vegetables. Game paintings are most frequent and reflect the influence of Frans Snyders. Adriaen adopted the same abundant displays of game, fruit and vegetables, usually set on a table parallel to the picture plane. Compositions typically fall in horizontal and vertical lines in contrast to the dynamic diagonals of Snyders. In large works, such as the Still-life with Game, Vegetables, Fruit and a Cockatoo (1650; Malibu, CA, Getty Mus.), Adriaen's accessories overflow the table on to the floor below. Baroque devices, such as a sweeping curtain and background window view, add movement and depth. Van Utrecht favoured warm earthen tones, especially grey-green, and a strong chiaroscuro light in his still-lifes; the latter may derive from his knowledge of Italian painting. The artist's style changed little during his career, save for the gradual elimination of figures in his paintings. The influence of Jan de Heem and Jan Fyt can also be seen in his later work.