Anna Elizabeth Klumpke
1856-1942 Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (October 28, 1856?C1942) was American portrait and genre painter born in San Francisco, California, United States. She is perhaps best known for her portraits of famous women including Rosa Bonheur and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1889). Her father, John Gerald Klumpke, born in England or Germany , was a successful and wealthy realtor in San Francisco. Her mother was Dorothea Mattilda Tolle. Anna was the eldest of eight children, five of whom lived to maturity. Among her siblings were the astronomer Dorothea Klumpke-Roberts, the violinist Julia Klumpke, and the neurologist Augusta D??jerine-Klumpke. At age three, Anna fell and suffered a fracture of her femur. She fell again at age five and suffered osteomyelitis with purulent knee arthritis. It handicapped her, and her mother took extraordinary means to remeded the problem by taking Anna and three siblings to Berlin for treatment by Dr. Bernhard von Langenbeck. The treatments lasted 18 months, including thermal baths at Kreuznach, but unfortunately they were not successful, and she would remained hobbled all her life. While in Europe, her mother ensured that all of her children had excellent tutoring. The time away in Europe placed a strain on the relationship of her parents. When Anna was fifteen, her parents divorced. She and her siblings (now numbering five) moved with their mother to Göttingen, Germany, where they lived for a time with Mattilda's sister, who had married a German national. Anna and her sister Augusta were sent to school at Cannstatt, near Stuttgart. At age seventeen, the family moved to Clarens, near Lake Geneva in Switzerland where she spent two years in boarding school. She studied art at home for the next few years, and in October 1877, moved with her family once more to Paris, where she was later enrolled in the Julian Academy (1883-1884), under the tutelage of Tony Robert-Fleury and Jules Lefebvre. At one point she also studied under Vuillefroy. She presented her first work at the Paris Salon in 1884, while still at the Academy, and she won the grand prize for outstanding student of the year. She showed regularly at the Salon for several more years.

 

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Anna Elizabeth Klumpke Catinou Knitting oil painting   

Painting ID::  4235
Anna Elizabeth Klumpke
Catinou Knitting
1887

   
   
     

 

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Anna Elizabeth Klumpke
1856-1942 Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (October 28, 1856?C1942) was American portrait and genre painter born in San Francisco, California, United States. She is perhaps best known for her portraits of famous women including Rosa Bonheur and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1889). Her father, John Gerald Klumpke, born in England or Germany , was a successful and wealthy realtor in San Francisco. Her mother was Dorothea Mattilda Tolle. Anna was the eldest of eight children, five of whom lived to maturity. Among her siblings were the astronomer Dorothea Klumpke-Roberts, the violinist Julia Klumpke, and the neurologist Augusta D??jerine-Klumpke. At age three, Anna fell and suffered a fracture of her femur. She fell again at age five and suffered osteomyelitis with purulent knee arthritis. It handicapped her, and her mother took extraordinary means to remeded the problem by taking Anna and three siblings to Berlin for treatment by Dr. Bernhard von Langenbeck. The treatments lasted 18 months, including thermal baths at Kreuznach, but unfortunately they were not successful, and she would remained hobbled all her life. While in Europe, her mother ensured that all of her children had excellent tutoring. The time away in Europe placed a strain on the relationship of her parents. When Anna was fifteen, her parents divorced. She and her siblings (now numbering five) moved with their mother to Göttingen, Germany, where they lived for a time with Mattilda's sister, who had married a German national. Anna and her sister Augusta were sent to school at Cannstatt, near Stuttgart. At age seventeen, the family moved to Clarens, near Lake Geneva in Switzerland where she spent two years in boarding school. She studied art at home for the next few years, and in October 1877, moved with her family once more to Paris, where she was later enrolled in the Julian Academy (1883-1884), under the tutelage of Tony Robert-Fleury and Jules Lefebvre. At one point she also studied under Vuillefroy. She presented her first work at the Paris Salon in 1884, while still at the Academy, and she won the grand prize for outstanding student of the year. She showed regularly at the Salon for several more years.