CIGOLI
Italian Baroque Era Painter, 1559-1613 was an Italian painter and architect of the late Mannerist and early Baroque period, trained and active in his early career in Florence, and spending the last nine years of his life in Rome. Lodovico Cardi was born at Villa Castelvecchio di Cigoli, in Tuscany, whence the name by which he is commonly known. Initially, Cigoli trained in Florence under the fervid mannerist Alessandro Allori. Later, influenced by the most prominent of the Contra-Maniera painters, Santi di Tito, as well as by Barocci, Cigoli shed the shackles of mannerism and infused his later paintings with an expressionism often lacking from 16th century Florentine painting. For example, for the Roman patron, Massimo Massimi, he painted an Ecce Homo[1] (now in Palazzo Pitti). Supposedly unbenknownst to any of the painters, two other prominent contemporary painters, Passignano and Caravaggio, had been requested canvases on the same theme. It is unclear if they are completely independent. Cigoli's painting seems to have been made with knowledge of Caravaggio's canvas; however, while Cigoli's work lacks the power of Caravaggio's naturalism, the background shade and sparse foreground shows how much he was moving away from crowded Florentine historical paintings. This work was afterwards taken by Bonaparte to the Louvre, and was restored to Florence in 1815. One of his early paintings was of Cain slaying Abel. He then gained the employ of the Grand-Duke in some works for the Pitti Palace, where he painted a Venus and Satyr and a Sacrifice of Isaac. Other important pictures are St. Peter Healing the Lame Man in St Peter's; Conversion of St. Paul in the church of San Paolo fuori le Mura, and a Story of Psyche in a fresco incorporated in the decorative scheme of the Villa Borghese; a Martyrdom of Stephen, which earned him the name of the "Florentine Correggio", a Stigmata of St. Francis at Florence. Cigoli was made a Knight of Malta at the request of Pope Paul III. Cigoli, a close personal friend of Galileo Galilei, painted a last fresco in the dome of the Pauline chapel of the church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, depicting the Madonna standing upon a pock-marked lunar orb. This is the first extant example of Galileo's discoveries about the physical nature of the moon (as he himself drew it in Sidereus Nuncius) having penetrated the visual arts practice of his day. Until this image, the moon in pictures of the Virgin had always been mythical and smooth, perfectly spherical as described by Platonic & Ptolemaic tradition.

 

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CIGOLI Ecce Homo f oil painting   

Painting ID::  6025
CIGOLI
Ecce Homo f
1607 Oil on canvas, 175 x 135 cm Galleria Palatina (Palazzo Pitti), Florence

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI St Francis Receives the Stigmata  g oil painting   

Painting ID::  6026
CIGOLI
St Francis Receives the Stigmata g
1596 Oil on wood, 247 x 171 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI The Sacrifice of Isaac oil painting   

Painting ID::  28938
CIGOLI
The Sacrifice of Isaac
mk65 Oil on canvas 69 1/8x52 1/16in Pitti,

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI Ecce Homo oil painting   

Painting ID::  28939
CIGOLI
Ecce Homo
mk65 Oil on canvas 68 7/8x53 3/8in Pitti

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI St.Francis in Prayer oil painting   

Painting ID::  28984
CIGOLI
St.Francis in Prayer
mk65 Oil on canvas 55 5/16x45 1/16in Pitti,Palatine Gallery

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI Joseph and Potiphar's Wife oil painting   

Painting ID::  51210
CIGOLI
Joseph and Potiphar's Wife
1610 Oil on canvas

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI Portrait of Cosimo I de  Medici oil painting   

Painting ID::  83627
CIGOLI
Portrait of Cosimo I de Medici
16th century Medium Oil cyf

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI St Francis Receives the Stigmata oil painting   

Painting ID::  84627
CIGOLI
St Francis Receives the Stigmata
Date 1596(1596) Medium Oil on wood Dimensions Height: 247 cm (97.2 in). Width: 171 cm (67.3 in). cjr

   
   
     

 

 

CIGOLI St Francis Receives the Stigmata oil painting   

Painting ID::  86955
CIGOLI
St Francis Receives the Stigmata
1596(1596) Medium Oil on wood cyf

   
   
     

 

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CIGOLI
Italian Baroque Era Painter, 1559-1613 was an Italian painter and architect of the late Mannerist and early Baroque period, trained and active in his early career in Florence, and spending the last nine years of his life in Rome. Lodovico Cardi was born at Villa Castelvecchio di Cigoli, in Tuscany, whence the name by which he is commonly known. Initially, Cigoli trained in Florence under the fervid mannerist Alessandro Allori. Later, influenced by the most prominent of the Contra-Maniera painters, Santi di Tito, as well as by Barocci, Cigoli shed the shackles of mannerism and infused his later paintings with an expressionism often lacking from 16th century Florentine painting. For example, for the Roman patron, Massimo Massimi, he painted an Ecce Homo[1] (now in Palazzo Pitti). Supposedly unbenknownst to any of the painters, two other prominent contemporary painters, Passignano and Caravaggio, had been requested canvases on the same theme. It is unclear if they are completely independent. Cigoli's painting seems to have been made with knowledge of Caravaggio's canvas; however, while Cigoli's work lacks the power of Caravaggio's naturalism, the background shade and sparse foreground shows how much he was moving away from crowded Florentine historical paintings. This work was afterwards taken by Bonaparte to the Louvre, and was restored to Florence in 1815. One of his early paintings was of Cain slaying Abel. He then gained the employ of the Grand-Duke in some works for the Pitti Palace, where he painted a Venus and Satyr and a Sacrifice of Isaac. Other important pictures are St. Peter Healing the Lame Man in St Peter's; Conversion of St. Paul in the church of San Paolo fuori le Mura, and a Story of Psyche in a fresco incorporated in the decorative scheme of the Villa Borghese; a Martyrdom of Stephen, which earned him the name of the "Florentine Correggio", a Stigmata of St. Francis at Florence. Cigoli was made a Knight of Malta at the request of Pope Paul III. Cigoli, a close personal friend of Galileo Galilei, painted a last fresco in the dome of the Pauline chapel of the church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, depicting the Madonna standing upon a pock-marked lunar orb. This is the first extant example of Galileo's discoveries about the physical nature of the moon (as he himself drew it in Sidereus Nuncius) having penetrated the visual arts practice of his day. Until this image, the moon in pictures of the Virgin had always been mythical and smooth, perfectly spherical as described by Platonic & Ptolemaic tradition.